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Rice University’s Student Newspaper — Since 1916

Thursday, June 24, 2021 — Houston, TX 94°

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Black Art at Rice: Jones Business alumna April M. Frazier Documents Life, Family and Hidden Stories

(04/21/21 2:22am)

Ten years after graduating from the Jones Graduate School of Business and starting her photography company, April M. Frazier reflects on her journey into photography — an unconventional path, in which she spent 15 years working in the oil industry. Although Frazier’s portfolio showcases everything from street life in Jamaica to Bruno Mars at the Super Bowl, she finds the most fulfillment from uncovering her family history. By reintroducing her family photos into the historical narrative, Frazier hopes to illustrate authentic African American stories for future generations.  


HACER’s ¡Ritmo! celebrates community resiliency and futurity

(03/24/21 3:31am)

¡Ritmo! is known for being an explosion of vibrant colors, sounds and style, and for the members of Rice’s Hispanic community involved onstage and behind the scenes, it’s both a celebration of their cultures and a testament to their perseverance. The annual showcase is the chef-d’œuvre of the Hispanic Association for Cultural Enrichment at Rice. This year’s Ritmo (Spanish for “rhythm”) will be screened virtually at watch parties hosted by each of the residential colleges on Saturday, March 27. The event will include singing, dancing, poetry recitation and other artistic interpretations from both Rice students and members of the larger Houston community.


Local organizations partner to revitalize the legacy of Houston's historic Freedmen's Town

(02/03/21 3:53am)

Nestled in Houston’s Fourth Ward is the city’s historic Freedmen’s Town, a neighborhood of formerly enslaved Black people settled post-emancipation into what would become a cultural and artistic hub, rightfully earning the Fourth Ward its title as the "Harlem of the South" in the early twentieth century. While only around 50 of the original 508 structures are still standing in the 40-block district, Freedmen’s Town remains a historical, cultural and artistic hub, and local non-profit Houston Freedmen’s Town Conservancy is dedicated to protecting and revitalizing the site’s legacy.