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Monday, December 05, 2022 — Houston, TX

From the opinion editor’s desk: The opinion section is a space meant for the Rice community

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By Nayeli Shad     11/16/21 11:11pm

As the semester nears its end, it’s time to reflect on the state of the opinion section this fall amidst a near return to normalcy, and to look forward to another semester of opinions. We’ve had a multitude of opinions and editorials published on a wide range of subjects. Still, some people coming to campus for the first time or who did not engage much with our paper while we were working online last year may not be all that familiar with the opinion section. I want to reintroduce the possibilities that the section offers for all of the Rice community.

The Thresher accepts guest opinions from any Rice student, faculty, staff or alum about topics that are related to the Rice community. Additionally, if you want to respond to a piece that the Thresher has published, you can submit a letter to the editor to be published in the opinion section.

Many community members flock to the opinion section to push for big change, and some have been successful. But as my predecessor so eloquently wrote, your opinion doesn’t have to change the world. No matter how big or small the issue, if you have an opinion that you’re passionate about and want to share with your peers, the opinion section is the place for you to do that.



The range of topics covered in the opinion section are broad. Recently published opinions span from reconsidering the use of the terms Hispanic and Latinx on campus to easing COVID-19 restrictions on student activities to bringing back the Rice University Farmers Market. All opinions are welcome so long as they are pertinent to the Rice community.

To get started writing your opinion, all you have to do is follow our opinion submission policy, which includes guidelines on content, format and authorship. When you’re ready, send a draft to thresher@rice.edu. If you’re apprehensive about writing, don’t worry — we’ll work with you every step of the editing process to get your opinion out to the community in its clearest form. Every edit is approved by you to preserve your voice as much as possible. That is the spirit of the opinion section.



More from The Rice Thresher

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Is using Fizz worth sacrificing our Culture of Care?

The social media app Fizz made its way to our campus earlier this semester, offering an anonymous discussion platform for exchanging messages and memes amongst Rice students. In recent weeks, antisemitic and racist posts were made by members of our community on this app. It is entirely hateful and dangerously intolerant. 

OPINION 11/29/22 10:54pm
International issues deserve our attention, too

Anyone who walked through the academic quad on Monday encountered the statue of William Marsh Rice visibly covered by sheets of A4 paper that read “习近平下台,” which roughly translates to “Resign Xi Jinping.” Other signs read “No emperor in a republic” and “Not my president.” These signs are part of larger protests happening in mainland China — that are being echoed by Chinese people across the world — in response to nearly three years of aggressive COVID lockdowns across the country. 

OPINION 11/15/22 10:21pm
Where we must agree: the politics of humanness

The words “free speech” will likely elicit groans from Thresher readers. Over the last three years, there have been three articles in the Opinion section bemoaning the need for a “classically liberal” political discourse at Rice. Unfortunately, between their self-righteousness and needless wordiness, they read more like whiny lectures than conversation starters. However, despite their condescension, their existence does suggest something unsettling about not just our campus politics, but politics at large. As the electorates of democracies around the world have become more sharply divided, the way we speak to each other, not just across the aisle but to our similarly minded partisans, has become more accusatory, exclusionary and violent. Put simply: we do not want to talk to each other, and understandably so. It is exhausting, and, more than that, we just don’t seem to know how to.


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