Rice University’s Student Newspaper — Since 1916

Thursday, May 23, 2019 — Houston, TX 78°

Meet your 2019-2020 college presidents

By Biz Rasich     2/26/19 9:33pm

Chloe Oani. Courtesy Laura Yordan

Lovett - Chloe Oani, Sophomore

1. Why did you choose to run for president?



My desire to run for president had a simple origin: Lovett is my home. As our college goes through a time of transition (new Magisters, infrastructure changes), I wanted to be on the “front line” of embracing new changes while maintaining beloved Lovett traditions.

2. What plans do you have for your college?

My primary goal for Lovett is to create an environment where every single student has the opportunity to share ideas in making our community better. Regardless of their current relationship with the college, each Lovetteer should feel empowered to work with elected and appointed representatives to see that their ideas for positive change are explored and implemented. We embrace inclusivity and opportunity as key elements of Lovett culture; we should continue to instill those values into our student government too.

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

As a freshman, I served as one of Lovett’s two Central Committee New Student Representatives and as a Beer Bike Alumni Coordinator. This past year, I was an elected Associates Coordinator and an appointed Sport Representative.

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate

member? 

As a student manager for the Rice Women’s Soccer Team, I have gained unique insight on Rice

from a student-athlete perspective. Not only would I like to be a bridge between Lovett and

campus-wide student government, but I want to bridge that gap between the general student body and our student athletes too.


Kyle Bartsch. Courtesy Amy Griffiths

Jones - Kyle Bartsch, Junior

1. Why did you choose to run for president?

I wanted to be able to help Jones run efficiently and to ensure all Jonesians have their voices heard. I felt I would do a good job connecting with my peers and helping our government implement their vision of Jones.

2. What plans do you have for your college?

I plan to improve communication between the Jones government and our fellow Jonesians. By doing this, I hope to encourage more student involvement in college activities and more discussion regarding campus-wide issues.

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

I’ve been actively involved in Jones since I was a freshman. I’m a past Jones treasurer, O-Week coordinator and chief justice.

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as a Student Association Senate member? 

Honestly, I don’t have much experience with the SA Senate. I’m looking forward to working with the Jones Senator to best represent Jones. I’m hoping to encourage more discussion regarding SA topics throughout Jones, and I’m happy to help Jonesians implement any ideas they have. 


James Alex Warner, Jr. Courtesy Ashton Duke

Baker - James Alex Warner, Jr., Baker College Junior

1.Why did you choose to run for president?

I was initially inspired to become involved in Baker's culture and community since my first O-Week. Over the years, I have received so much from my loving friends in every class at Baker. Though most of my contributions to our college so far have been unofficial, I found the presidential role the best avenue to improve the college I gladly call my second home!

2. What plans do you have for your college?

I plan to increase involvement at Baker across the board. By taking in the desires of a wide base of Bakerites, leadership will be able to complete and relate their different projects. I also want to not only express the need for inclusion, but reach out to show that our college government will incorporate the needs of all the diverse groups housed here.

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

As for understanding Baker structure, I have advised at O-Week twice and inserted myself into a variety of different social groups in Baker. From a managerial perspective, I have held multiple positions in societies and clubs around campus.

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate member?

I hope to work as an advocate for the efforts which Bakerites voice as important during our own government meetings. As a subscriber to ecocentrism, I intend to advocate for environmental initiatives through SA Senate.


Joyce Chen. Courtesy Joyce Chen

McMurtry - Joyce Chen, McMurtry College Junior

1. Why did you choose to run for president?

The McMurtry and Rice communities have made me who I am today, and I want to give back to it during my final year by continuing to work on the initiatives I'm passionate about.

2. What plans do you have for your college?

For McMurtry's 10th anniversary, we're planning a capital campaign to launch an endowment. I'm also looking forward to strengthening our community by revamping our public spaces and hall rep system and by engaging historically underrepresented groups.

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

I've served as new student representative, SA diversity committee chair, and I am the current McMurtry senator. I've also served three years on the University Court and chaired the McMurtry budget rollover committee. I've focused on socioeconomic inclusivity, such as by establishing the first magister's fund at Rice and leading the effort to advocate for equal financial aid for international students.

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate member?

I hope to continue advocating for socioeconomic and diversity initiatives and to speak up on issues that matter. As student leaders, we have the responsibility to not shirk away from difficult or controversial topics and should constantly push for progress.


Tim Thomas II. Courtesy Agustin Carrizalles

Wiess - Tim Thomas, Wiess College Sophomore

1. Why did you choose to run for president?

I felt as though I was both prepared and passionate enough about my college's success to run for a position in which I could provide the most help for that cause.

2. What plans do you have for your college?

Wiess is known for its familial sense of community, and my goal is to ensure that this continues. [I also would like it to become] more welcoming to those who may have [felt unwelcome] in the past, including members of our own community.

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

I was previously my college senator, giving me experience within the SA Senate and a view into the responsibilities of my own college president. I had also been an active member of my college government and culture prior to the election.

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate member?

Hopefully I play the role of an advisor, applying my previous experience within the SA Senate in an effort to understand where pending projects need to go and what about the SA needs to change in the future.


Louis Cole. Courtesy Freddie Wang

Duncan  - Louis Cole, Duncan College Junior

1. Why did you choose to run for president?

I chose to run for president because I think I have a unique perspective of not being involved in government before. I have seen how decisions trickle down to the general population of Duncan, and with that knowledge, I hope to bridge the gap between our executive committee and the rest of the Duncaroos.

2. What plans do you have for your college? 

This upcoming year is an important one. Duncan will be turning 10 and we will have to select new magisters and possibly new A-Team members. With that being said, my main goal as president is to have concrete definitions of things here at Duncan, [like responsibilities of the A-team,] before my term is over. I think this could be accomplished through communicating what Duncan was, is and could be in the time to come.

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

I am currently the student maintenance representative, one of the head caregivers, and a mailroom employee. This past year, I was also an O-Week coordinator. I feel like these positions have prepared me not only to lead Duncan, but also become an effective liaison between the Duncaroos and those higher up.

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate member?

I hope to be an accurate "face of Duncan” when voting and participating in various working groups and committees. 


Landon Mabe. Courtesy Landon Mabe

Hanszen College - Landon Mabe, Junior

1. Why did you choose to run for president? 

I decided to run for president because I love Hanszen and feel that my experience serving the college and the relationships I have built with the people here put me in a position in which I can be an effective leader.

2. What plans do you have for your college? 

With a New New Section on the horizon, I plan to establish a long-standing committee that will work with Housing & Dining from the pre-design process all the way to the building's eventual construction. I also plan to lead a review of our constitution and bylaws to ensure that Hanszen's governing documents are in line with the practices of the college, updating them when necessary.

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

Before the presidency, I served as one of Hanszen's secretaries and then as external vice president. Through both roles, I gained an understanding of the internal operations of the college that prepared me to lead Hanszen successfully. Additionally, through my prior positions, I have established great working relationships with the H-Team, H&D and my fellow Hanszenites which I can bring forward into my presidency. 

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate member?

I hope to work on issues important to Hanszenites and empower all Hanszen students to become involved in the SA Senate if they feel passionate about an issue.


Anna Margaret Clyburn. Courtesy Jennifer Fu

Martel - Anna Margaret Clyburn, Sophomore

1. Why did you choose to run for president?

I chose to run for president because I saw a need for a community-minded leader at Martel. The most common concern I’ve heard about this college is that it lacks  strong community, so when deciding to run for president one of my main considerations was “Can I effectively bring people together?” It’s the same question that I asked myself before advising during O-Week, before leading an alternative spring break trip, and before initially becoming involved in the SA Senate. What ended up fully convincing to run me was the realization that though I can’t predict the future and say for sure whether or not I will achieve that goal, my strong background creating community in other roles provides me with a good idea of how to go about doing it here. In short, Martel is my family — I’ll do everything I can to make this college as strong a family to others as possible.

2. What plans do you have for your college?

I want to help strengthen Martel’s community. I want to see parliament better attended, which is why I’m chatting with Martel’s executive council about ways to make the space more welcoming. I want to strengthen our culture of gratitude by making posters to thank our wonderful H&D workers. I want to see the Magister’s Discretionary Fund better utilized, which is why I’m working with a few Martelians to provide more subsidies on fun events and merchandise. I want to see class representatives get more involved, which is why I’m working on a team to better outline their roles. I want to see Martel students support each other, which is why I’m participating in theatre for the very first time in my life with the Martel-Sid theatre group. And I want to get to know more Martelians, which is why I’m trying my best to attend as many Martel events as possible and to empower all Martelians to plan any sort of activity that will appeal to their and other students’ unique interests. Every Martelian, regardless of their background and tastes, deserves a warm and welcoming family to come home to at the end of the day — my plan is to facilitate that connection as best I can!

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

As a new student, I was a Martel NSR and as a sophomore I was Martel’s senator. I have also been involved in a variety of Martel-specific events and traditions, from discussions on women’s empowerment to beer biking to O-Week advising. I believe that my campus-wide experience coupled with my experience participating in Martel culture qualify me to be Martel’s president; I can go from writing SA legislation that reflects Martel’s interests to returning to my college and enjoying sundeck fundeck with the Martel family!

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate member?

I’ve been involved in the SA Senate since my freshman year and have seen all the change that can be made there. As president, I will continue working with the Increasing African Presence in Academia Committee to improve the African studies minor and expand student engagement with African studies; I will remain a co-chair of the Visual and Dramatic Arts working group, a group charged with investigating and offering recommendations for improving problems existing within the VADA department; I will push for more sustainability initiatives and participate in conversations with administrators about ways to reduce Rice’s carbon footprint; and I will advocate for improved financial accessibility, especially for off-campus students experiencing food insecurity. But one of the most important things I’ve learned in my time working with the SA Senate is that you can never anticipate what problems may pop up. So I’ll also remain flexible and open to working on any concerns that may arise throughout the year! I perceive the role of an SA Senate member as being that of an advocate — so I’ll always consider ever student’s wellbeing and how a piece of legislation may affect them when voting at SA Senate. 


Frances Williamson. Courtesy Frances Williamson

Brown - Frances Williamson, Junior

1.      Why did you choose to run for president?

I ran for president because I saw the importance of the work our executive committee did to make Brown more inclusive and address the needs of our college. Brown is an amazing college and home to a fantastic group of individuals who have so much to offer our small community and Rice at large.

2.      What plans do you have for your college?

Two years ago, Brown began a strategic planning process called "Brown to the Future" that initiated great change within our college. I hope to continue to implement and refine the structures that arose from this initiative and to encourage college-wide involvement and feedback. Specifically, we will continue to engage cross-campus organizations, encourage involvement outside the hedges, improve our culture of inclusivity and incorporate an almost entirely new A-Team into our community.

3.      What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

My role as CJ let me witness the work and effort that goes into making Brown run smoothly and let me collaborate on discussions and initiatives to improve and protect our college culture. Also, serving Brown as an academic fellow and Beer Bike coordinator helped me see the wide range of passions, goals and values of our community and gave me the opportunity to work alongside many wonderful Brownies. I believe each person can contribute unique ideas and stories that enrich the culture of Brown and make it a better place to live and grow.

4.      What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate member? 

I hope to be a voice for my college and help serve Brown’s best interests. Members of our community are already implementing and spearheading great change across campus, and I would love to support and help them in their efforts. The SA Senate is a great arena for expressing opinions and addressing campus-wide concerns and I would ensure that Brown’s values are incorporated into these conversations.


Mckinzie Chambers. Courtesy Isabel Wiatt

Sid - McKinzie Chambers, Junior

1. Why did you choose to run for president?

I ran to give back to an amazing community that has challenged and supported me throughout my Rice career.  I’m prepared to put in work for my college to make us more inclusive, thoughtful, and helpful. 

2. What plans do you have for your college?

I plan to revamp our low-income accessibility and wellbeing programs, welcome our new Magisters and Resident Associates to the best college and prepare us for New Sid. New Sid will challenge our community culturally, systematically and physically, but with strategic planning, fun traditions and strong leaders, Sid will be good to go.

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

This past year my two largest commitments were being Sid's chief justice and the Student Association chief of staff. Being CJ taught me to adapt quickly to new problems, trust in my college and work well with administrators to voice concerns. Being chief of staff helped me learn about a variety of campus-wide issues and solutions by managing the working groups and task forces and ensuring they produce good work. 

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate member?

I want to challenge SA Senate leadership to think critically about campus-wide issues and student body engagement. We should not only represent our colleges by our vote, but also be active listeners in our community to bring in new voices to Senate.


Juliette Richert. Courtesy Elizabeth Hang

WRC - Juliette Richert, Junior

1. Why did you choose to run for president?

Student autonomy at Rice is something I've really come to appreciate. I think it's incredible that we have so much say (and financial support) in how we shape our community. I chose to run for president because WRC's mutual respect, responsibility and care are what makes this community so special to me, and I believe I can play a role in ensuring we continue to emphasize these values. 

2. What plans do you have for your college?

My platform is centered around inclusion. I want to continue conversations about WRC culture and ensure there are a variety of event types to appeal to all Will Ricers and plenty of ways to be an involved community member. Additionally, I'm very interested in improving how we, as a college, welcome associates and keep them engaged throughout the year. 

3. What is your past experience that makes you qualified to be president?

In 2018, I coordinated WRC O-Week, which taught me how to define a vision, set goals and maintain a long-term perspective. I've also had smaller roles, including as freshman representative and outreach committee member, which have given me insight into the beauties and difficulties of our government system.

4. What role do you hope to play in campus-wide student government as an SA Senate member? 

As a member of the SA Senate and in conjunction with our senator, I will do my best to be transparent and informative to the Will Rice population. The conversations we've been having surrounding the SA election shed some light on the fact that a lot of Rice students don't feel included in SA Senate conversations, so I want to ensure the opinions students I represent as a member of SA Senate are heard and valued. 



More from The Rice Thresher

NEWS 5/11/19 4:26pm
Graduation 2019: Rain distracts but fails to disrupt

Class of 2019 graduates came to Saturday morning’s commencement with their caps, gowns, stoles and umbrellas. Despite forecasted downpours and the proposed alternative venue of Tudor Fieldhouse, both Friday and Saturday ceremonies were held outside. Like their matriculation ceremony four years ago, the graduates saw rain fall as they were granted their degrees. 

NEWS 5/10/19 11:07am
Martel College senior Muna Uzodike to speak at graduation

“I truly believe we find our unique purpose in that space, because no one can be copied to the T,” Uzodike said. “We have a lot to bring to the table and I just want to remind people that no matter what space they find themselves in, they should never abandon the traits, gifts or skills that make them unique.”

NEWS 4/27/19 5:49pm
The Hoot to stop selling Chick-fil-A

Student-run business The Hoot announced Wednesday that they would no longer serve food from fast food chain Chick-fil-A beginning next fall, citing misalignment between Chick-fil-A’s corporate values and The Hoot’s values. The Hoot’s announcement on Facebook garnered over 350 reactions and over 150 comments at time of publication, with students and alumni voicing varying opinions on the decision. 


Comments

Please note All comments are eligible for publication by The Rice Thresher.