Rice University’s Student Newspaper — Since 1916

Monday, December 05, 2022 — Houston, TX

102 years of reinventing the Thresher

By Drew Keller and Juan Saldaña     8/24/17 9:57pm

Right now, this letter is competing for your attention with an editorial, a much more inspiring letter from President Leebron and your syllabus week hangover. However, we will soon be competing for your readership against schoolwork, your friends and your overcommitted schedule. This isn’t a challenge we take lightly: At both a national and a community level, journalism is necessary more than ever.

We’ve come to the role of editor-in-chief through different paths — Drew as a news writer and editor, Juan as the paper’s business manager and a sports writer — but we share a common goal. From documenting day-to-day student life to investigating the most serious issues on our campus, we seek to provide an unbiased lens into the Rice community.

While continuing our tradition of relevant, timely journalism, we’re working on expanding the breadth and depth of the Thresher’s coverage. To this end, we’re launching a Spotlight section of the paper which will focus on individuals, organizations and events on campus that might not be covered by our traditional news, sports, and arts and entertainment articles. We’re also adding video and online features that supplement our print stories and bring news of campus happenings to you in more ways.



The Thresher is run by Rice students and published for Rice students, and we want our organization to reflect that in its accessibility. The Thresher’s mission is not just to provide news to the student body. We also aim to provide a working place for those students who are interested in journalism — particularly since Rice still does not offer journalism classes in a time in which it is vital to cultivate the next generation of journalists. If you’re interested in journalism or media, whether as a hobby, career or simply a means of being involved in your community, sign up to join us. Believe us, we’re not even close to professionally trained journalists, so no matter what your level of experience we could use your help in writing the first rough draft of Rice’s history.

The last part of the Thresher’s mission is to serve as a community forum, as a place for your voice. So that’s our request to you: Get involved. Speak up and send us your opinion pieces. If you like (or don’t like) something we’ve published, write a letter to the editor — or just come talk to us!



More from The Rice Thresher

OPINION 11/29/22 11:00pm
Is using Fizz worth sacrificing our Culture of Care?

The social media app Fizz made its way to our campus earlier this semester, offering an anonymous discussion platform for exchanging messages and memes amongst Rice students. In recent weeks, antisemitic and racist posts were made by members of our community on this app. It is entirely hateful and dangerously intolerant. 

OPINION 11/29/22 10:54pm
International issues deserve our attention, too

Anyone who walked through the academic quad on Monday encountered the statue of William Marsh Rice visibly covered by sheets of A4 paper that read “习近平下台,” which roughly translates to “Resign Xi Jinping.” Other signs read “No emperor in a republic” and “Not my president.” These signs are part of larger protests happening in mainland China — that are being echoed by Chinese people across the world — in response to nearly three years of aggressive COVID lockdowns across the country. 

OPINION 11/15/22 10:21pm
Where we must agree: the politics of humanness

The words “free speech” will likely elicit groans from Thresher readers. Over the last three years, there have been three articles in the Opinion section bemoaning the need for a “classically liberal” political discourse at Rice. Unfortunately, between their self-righteousness and needless wordiness, they read more like whiny lectures than conversation starters. However, despite their condescension, their existence does suggest something unsettling about not just our campus politics, but politics at large. As the electorates of democracies around the world have become more sharply divided, the way we speak to each other, not just across the aisle but to our similarly minded partisans, has become more accusatory, exclusionary and violent. Put simply: we do not want to talk to each other, and understandably so. It is exhausting, and, more than that, we just don’t seem to know how to.


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