Rice University’s Student Newspaper — Since 1916

Tuesday, November 12, 2019 — Houston, TX 33°

1000 items found for your search. If no results were found please broaden your search.



Good Eats: The Houston Black Food Truck Festival

(10/30/19 2:50am)

From Jamaican jerk chicken to loaded grilled cheese, the Third Annual Houston Black Food Truck Festival confirmed my belief that a happy stomach leads to a happy life. Taking place every October, the festival rallies together the greatest mobile eats of the greater Houston area. Food tells a story, and for many, that story fades after coming to college. All of a sudden, the comfort of home-cooked meals seemingly disappears overnight and is replaced with servery water chicken. Thankfully, the festival reminded me of what many of us are missing all the while showcasing some of the premiere Black-owned food trucks of the city. The flavors of each of the owner’s personalities and stories shined through their cuisine, and it made it clear that eating was about more than just getting full.


A night of chills and thrills in the Haunted Hall

(10/30/19 2:48am)

Something dark and twisted appeared on campus last Friday. While students were hiding from the cold that unexpectedly swept through the city, a large circus-like tent materialized in the Rice Memorial Center Grand Hall. Unknown creatures were heard shuffling behind the tapered sheets, murmuring in incomprehensible voices. When the clock struck 9, the grand hall door swung open and students crowded to catch a glimpse of the beings lurking in the tent.


Rex Orange County’s “Pony” is lackluster but genuine

(10/30/19 2:47am)

With “Pony,” indie pop artist Rex Orange County makes his debut with a major label while sticking to his genre-defying roots. The overall sound of the album is nigh impossible to define as songs alternate between crooning over gentle acoustics to rap to synth-pop. Despite this, each song in the album is connected by a common thread in the utter genuinity in Rex Orange County’s delivery.



Dancing with the Dead: Casa Ramirez hosts Dia de los Muertos in the Heights

(10/30/19 2:44am)

Across from Latinx folk art gallery Casa Ramirez, a large group of around 100 people gathered around on the evening of Saturday, Oct. 26 to watch Danza Azteca Taxacyolotl, a Houston Aztec-dance group. The smell of copal, an incense made of tree resin traditional to pre-Colombian Mesoamerica, was thick in the air. Families lined up holding crosses with pictures of their loved ones at the center, and the crowd followed the Aztec dancers and the beat of their drum down the street towards Casa Ramirez for the gallery’s annual Día de los Muertos community procession.


“Cats” captivates Hobby Center in single week production

(10/30/19 2:43am)

“Cats,” one of Andrew Lloyd Webber’s most famous musicals, returned to Houston for one week only, wowing audiences with its elaborate dancing, stunning lighting and most of all, its cats. Running Oct. 22 to Oct. 27 at Hobby Center to a house nearly full with patrons of all ages dressed in cheetah print and cat ears, “Cats” was captivating throughout the show. Creeping in and out of oversized junk-like ovens and tires while dressed in colorful, striped or tabby leotards, the cast led an excellent portrayal of the feline lifestyle. Opting to be at the theater instead of watching the World Series, I was not let down with this ensemble’s performance.


Take pride in Houston

(10/30/19 2:15am)

With the Astros having been on the national stage for the World Series, hopefully you’re feeling some Houston pride. When Beyoncé or Travis Scott top the charts, it’s fun to take  their shoutouts to H-Town a little personally. Spending four years in a city like Houston is the perfect opportunity to explore a city that we may never have the chance to live in again — it’s time to use the METRO system and actually get out of the hedges to understand what Houston has to offer. 


I am not a monster: After a psychotic episode, I was deferred from Rice for a year

(10/30/19 2:14am)

During Orientation Week my freshman year at Rice, I suffered a psychotic episode due to schizophrenia. I said what the voices were telling me and ended up saying inappropriate things. I was escorted by a Rice University Police Department vehicle to the emergency room, where I was then locked up in the psychiatric ward for six days. In those six days, I got better. My mental health improved, and I stopped hallucinating. I thought that would be the end of it. I would be released from the hospital and I would resume my studies at Rice. Hopefully, I could use what I learned to someday find better therapies for mental illnesses. But I was wrong. Because of the things I said during my psychotic episode and the way my case was handled, it felt as if the administration deemed me a threat to the Rice community. Ultimately, due to my schizophrenia, I was deferred for a year from Rice University.


Who told you about Africa?

(10/30/19 2:13am)

When I came to Rice, I was asked different questions by some students about Africa and Rwanda, my home country. “Does Rwanda still suffer from the 1994 genocide against the Tutsi?” “How is life like in Africa?” “Do many people own cars?” and “Is it true that people are always fighting?” were the most commonly asked. It always breaks my heart that most of what people know about my  home is the sorrow, poverty, instability and other things of the sort. It is true that Africa has its own problems, but the progress that is constantly being made should also be given a spotlight. It is the combination of Africa’s problems and progress that makes its whole story. My question today is, did the person who told you about Africa tell you the entire story, half of it or even less?


Response to ‘Call for a balanced narrative’: A no-nonsense narrative on Kashmir

(10/30/19 2:12am)

Three weeks ago, President Donald Trump attended Houston’s “Howdy, Modi!” event at NRG Stadium to advocate for Prime Minister Narendra Modi’s administration in India behind the facade of cultural celebration. Yet, outside the stadium, thousands of people of every race, religion, age, family background and political affiliation stood in the blistering heat to protest Modi’s administration and policy towards Kashmir. With a protesting body that diverse, it is a gross misrepresentation to represent the protest as focusing solely on the abrogation of Article 370, the subject of the opinion piece “Call for a balanced narrative on Kashmir”. The opinion piece is anything but balanced, so let’s take some time to analyze the causes and implications of the protest.










The Value of NOW

(10/23/19 2:32am)

What if we treated our time at Rice like what it actually is — a convergence of the world’s greatest minds and four years of unfettered access to the intellectual pillars of the past and the promise of the future? Dear Rice, your Orientation Week friends could one day change the world, and many of your professors and mentors already have.