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Saturday, September 26, 2020 — Houston, TX °

Arts and Entertainment



A&E 2/25/20 9:57pm

New Menil exhibition creates dialogues between past, present surrealist works

The Menil Collection’s “Photography and the Surreal Imagination” is a work of profound audacity, and is better for it. The exhibition, held in a single, large room bisected by a central wall, sets out to form a retrospective of surreal photography over a time period spanning from 1920 to today. The result is cramped and creative, displayed in a manner that seeks to draw big-picture linkages between eras and holds only lightly to chronology. 


A&E 2/25/20 9:55pm

Review: Grimes’s apocalyptic ‘Miss Anthropocene’ hides an Americana gem

“Miss Anthropocene” is the fifth studio album by electropop artist Grimes, intended to comment on climate change through a propaganda-filled, alternatingly dominant and submissive lyrical narrative of human extinction and an artificial intelligence takeover. Self-described as her final earth album, the 15-song, 67-minute journey is characterized by slow electric bass, rhythmic synths, echoey nonchalant vocals and the dichotomous sounds of wildlife and machine thrums, with the track “Delete Forever” as the perfect standout.




A&E 2/4/20 10:08pm

Africayé 2020 Preview

Hosted by the Rice African Student Association, “Africayé 2020: Coming to Africa” will immerse the Rice community in the sights, sounds and tastes of African culture this Sunday. The annual showcase will feature music, dance, fashion, comedy, skits, food and a newly added art gallery. 


A&E 2/4/20 10:07pm

Biggest snubs in the Oscars 2020 nominations as relayed by a bitter old hag

I’m not sure why we still care about an awards ceremony that continues to be #sowhite and once gave “Lord of the Rings” 11 Oscars (the same number of nominations that “Joker” somehow received this year) — but here we are! As “Green Book” taught me last year with its unexpected win for Best Picture, there’s no point in trying to predict this year’s big winners ahead of the ceremony, which will air this Sunday, Feb. 9 at 7 p.m. So, I’ll settle for pointing out the most painful snubs instead.





A&E 1/28/20 9:38pm

Moody Center’s ‘Radical Revisionists’ confronts colonial narratives

Last Friday, the Moody Center for the Arts came alive with visitors for the opening reception of “Radical Revisionists: Contemporary African Artists Confronting Past and Present.” The new exhibit, on display from Jan. 24 to May 16, features artists from Africa and its diaspora who challenge Eurocentric narratives of colonialism, migration and identity.





A&E 1/21/20 9:49pm

Predicting the 2020 Grammys: Winners, losers and snubs

It’s that time of the year! Houston continues to deny us a winter and the Grammy Awards continue to deny any representation to rap music! Even as I gripe to my friends about snubs of my favorite artists, I will still inevitably tune into the 62nd Annual Grammy Awards this Sunday, January 26.


A&E 1/21/20 9:48pm

“The Realistic Joneses” fails to satisfy

Surrounded by the audience at three sides, “The Realistic Joneses,” a play by 4th Wall Theatre Company, is an intimate production of Will Eno’s script. The play follows two couples with the last name Jones that have moved in next door to each other as they work through similar issues at different stages of life and in their relationships. 



A&E 1/14/20 10:17pm

Review: ‘1917’ triumphs in uncharted territory

Coming fresh off of two Golden Globe wins for best director and best drama motion picture, Sam Mendes’ “1917” earned immense critical acclaim and seemed destined for box office success before the film even hit most American theaters Jan. 10. This praise is well deserved; “1917” proves to be a breathtaking piece of filmmaking, using a “one-take” technique where the entire film is made to appear as one continuous shot.



A&E 1/14/20 10:14pm

Freedom reigns in new MFAH ‘Norman Rockwell’ exhibit

The Museum of Fine Arts, Houston tells the story of how Norman Rockwell’s iconic depictions of President Franklin D. Roosevelt’s Four Freedoms — freedom of speech, freedom of worship, freedom from fear and freedom from want — changed American society forever with “Norman Rockwell: American Freedom.”