Rice University’s Student Newspaper — Since 1916

Saturday, June 15, 2019 — Houston, TX 83°

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Response to 'Identity Politics' : If you claim oppression does not exist, you don't understand what it is

(11/29/17 5:07am)

Last week, the op-ed titled “Take individual responsibility: Identity politics are not a real solution to social issues” called that we “look inside, not outside” and then “get up and go to work,” rather than project blame forof our individual flaws on othersthose other than us. This piece was woefully ignorant and indicative of the importance of the message marginalized populations have been shouting forever: Stop speaking over us. Though it may seem that “we’ve traded a struggle between rich and poor for a struggle between affinity groups,” that’s simply not true. These groups have always been present and have always been fighting for their voice. You just haven’t heard them until now. Living in a country with a history of violently silencing those who stray from the norm, it’s no wonder that at a time like this, when these oppressed populations are finally finding outlets to speak, you may be feeling a little overwhelmed.


Response to 'Identity Politics' : Opportunity and power lie in social context, not a vacuum of individual responsibility

(11/29/17 5:04am)

The opinion piece “Take individual responsibility: Identity politics are not a real solution to social issues” contains a perspective that some Rice students share, but ignores the historical context of the social issues to which the author refers. The author interprets “identity politics” as a buzzword meant to divide. However, the term was meant to bring attention to groups historically ignored in major sociopolitical movements, in particular black women and other women of color.


​U.S. drug law a fabricated excuse for mass incarceration

(11/29/17 5:00am)

Even as America continues to lose competence on the world stage, one pillar of our society stands uncontested: the skyrocketing number of prisoners. In the U.S., the home of the free, we have the highest incarceration rate in the world — triple the prison population of Russia. These numbers have been on the rise since Nixon’s 1971 declaration of the “War on Drugs.” While America’s crime rate remained stable between 1972 and 2012, our prison population grew from 300,000 to 2 million. This man-made crisis was crafted to treat a nonexistent problem, using the scapegoat of petty drug crimes to disproportionately arrest minorities in order to make a quick buck and create a class of contemporary untouchables we call “criminals.”



​Julie Maroh’s ‘Body Music’ is a longed-for ode to queerness

(11/29/17 4:31am)

Comic artist and graphic novelist Julie Maroh is back on the market with her fourth book, “Body Music.” Translated from French by David Hormel, the collection of 21 vignettes on love and relationships was published this November. Her illustrated narratives are raw, soothing, familiar and organic all at once as they unfold over pages painted in muted brown and gray tones of linseed oil. But the most refreshing aspect of Maroh’s study of love is her focus on historically erased stories. As the author states in the introduction, “Bow-legged, chubby, ethnic, androgynous, trans, pierced, scarred, ill, disabled, old, hairy, outside all the usual aesthetic criteria … queers, dykes, trans, freaks, the non-monogamous, flighty and spiny hearts [...] we are not a minority; we are the alternatives. There are as many love stories as there are imaginations.” Readers who have found themselves inundated by stories of love between people who are straight, white, monogamous and TV-screen beautiful are given a chance to see their own stories play out on the pages of “Body Music.”


​‘Lady Bird’ reshapes the coming-of-age story

(11/29/17 4:38am)

As teenagers, we often think our parents have no idea what we’re going through when, in reality, they do. Parents don’t usually have as much of a starring role as the youths (usually male) in coming-of-age stories. If teenage girls are present, they’re often ensemble members or supporting players, rarely given the spotlight. Written and directed by Greta Gerwig, “Lady Bird” gives both parents and young women a voice in a fascinating genre that will never run out of tales to tell.









Hostile crowd forced Architectronica shutdown, RUPD says

(11/24/17 6:21pm)

Rice University Police Department officers shut down Architectronica, the annual public party hosted by School of Architecture students, at approximately 12:15 a.m. Sunday morning, according to RUPD Captain Clemente Rodriguez. An RUPD party supervisor decided public safety was in danger after attendees refused to make space on the dance floor by moving into an overflow room and partygoers in line outside Anderson Hall tried to force their way into the building, Rodriguez said.


​LEAP is not what’s best for Rice

(11/21/17 6:15pm)

Intention and purpose are two very powerful things. Unfortunately, these two values are missing from the Student Association’s Lifetime Enrichment Activities Program proposal. LEAP is a proposal to replace the current one-credit hour Lifetime Physical Activity Program graduation requirement with a new one-credit hour LEAP requirement. To fulfill LEAP, students can choose a one-credit hour course from any of the following categories: cultural enrichment, physical activity, mental well-being, financial literacy, leadership and civic engagement. The rationale provided by the students proposing the change, which if passed by the SA will need to be approved by the Committee for Undergraduate Curriculum, is that such a change would “cultivate a diverse community of learning and discovery that produces leaders across the spectrum of human endeavor.” The resolution for the proposal also includes the statistic that “more than 70 percent of Rice students are involved in some kind of athletic activity.” Finally, they conclude by saying that Rice’s current requirements could be improved by giving students more autonomy.






Beauty hacks to save your wallet

(11/15/17 11:29pm)

Picture this: You’re watching a makeup tutorial when the blogger pulls out four eyeshadow palettes, three concealers, two primers and a dozen other products — all for a “simple, no-makeup-makeup” look. With advancements in the beauty industry, it’s easy to find products marketed to pinpoint every single specific issue. It’s hard enough to decide what you’re going to eat for breakfast, let alone decide between 20 different mascaras. (Do I want one that lengthens my lashes or one that volumizes them? Maybe both?) Makeup routines are getting longer, with hundreds of different steps and tons of makeup products. But let’s be real — as college students, we are two things: tired and broke. Who has time to spend 45 minutes on makeup before a 9 a.m. class or blow money on new products just to keep up with increasingly intricate tutorials? Shorten your routine and save money for Coffeehouse with these hacks that show you how to get the most bang for your buck out of products that you already own.